(10) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1a.6b ISABELLA CUSHMAN* (See above)
SpouseJAMES WELD13860 , 5973
Mr. Weld married 1st, Isabella’s sister, Elener Wendell. Had no children.13860
Family ID4096
Marriageaft 1846264

Other spouses: SAMUEL A. EATON

(9) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b ELKANAH CUSHMAN* (See above)
SpouseMARY ELIZA BABBIT11034 , 1317
Birth1793, Boston, Suffolk Co. MA13867,13868
Death7 May 1865, Liverpool, England, age: 7210833,264,264,13869,13870
Death Memoor Brixham, England
BurialCremated ashes scattered256
She now resides with her daughter in Liverpool, England. 10833Died at Liverpool, England.10833
Family ID757
Marriage18 Oct 1815, Boston, MA10833,9515
ChildrenCHARLOTTE SAUNDERS , 3776 (1816-1876)
 CHARLES LATHROP AUGUSTUS , 2019 (1818-1896)
 FITZ HENRY , 2020 (1820-1821)
 SUSAN WEBB , 5974 (1822-1859)
 AUGUSTUS BABBITT , 2021 (1825-1837)

Other spouses: SUSANNAH WENDELL LOTHROP

(10) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.1 CHARLOTTE SAUNDERS CUSHMAN 13871,13872,13873, 3776
Birth23 Jul 1816, Boston, Suffolk Co., MA13872
Death18 Feb 1876, Boston, Suffolk Co., MA, age: 5913872,13869
BurialMount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, MA13872,256
FlagsGen #8
Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of Elkanah Cushman and Mary Eliza (Babbit) Cushman. Famous actress. See Research Notes. Charlotte took in the son (Edwin Charles “Ned” Cushman) of her younger sister (Susan Webb Cushman) who at the age of 14 had married Nelson Merriman. Her husband left her shortly thereafter, pregnant, leaving Charlotte to care for her sister. Edwin was raised as a Cushman, and married one of Charlotte’s younger lovers. Many Cushman descendants can be traced to him. See: Cushman Genealogy written by Col. Charles Van Brant Cushman, 1975, which I have on file. See further biography at: http://www.glbtq.com/arts/cushman_c,3.html. See also a long biography in HWCushman. 13874

CUSHMAN, Charlotte Saunders, actress, b. in Boston, Mass., 23 July, 1816; d. there, 18 Feb., 1876. She was a descendant in the eighth generation from Robert Cushman. Her father rose from poverty to be a successful West India merchant, but lost his fortune, and died, leaving his family in straitened circumstances. Charlotte was a remarkably bright, sportive child, excelling her schoolmates and developing a voice of remarkable compass and richness, with a full contralto register. Two friends of her father, one of them John Mackey, in whose piano factory Jonas Chickering was then foreman, provided her with the best musical instruction. She sang in choirs, and aided in the support of the family from the age of twelve. When Mrs. Joseph Wood visited Boston in 1834, Capt. Mackey introduced Miss Cushman, who sang with her in two of her concerts. Through Mrs. Wood's influence she became an articled pupil to James G. Maeder, that lady's musical director, and under his instruction made her first appearance in opera in the Tremont theatre as the Countess Almaviva in the “Marriage of Figaro” with great success, and her second as Lucy Bertram in “Guy Mannering.” She went with his company to New Orleans, where her voice, which had been strained by the soprano parts assigned to her, suddenly failed. Seeking the counsel of James H. Caldwell, manager of the principal theatre of New Orleans, she was advised by him and by Barton, the tragedian, to become an actress, and given the part of Lady Macbeth to study, in which she made her appearance with complete success in 1835. Going to New York, she declined a trial at the Park theatre, to enter into a three years' engagement with Thomas Hamblin, of the Bowery theatre, where she appeared for a season in leading tragic roles. Miss Cushman brought her mother, who had supported the family by keeping a boarding-house, to New York; but soon after this the theatre was burned, and her wardrobe, for which she was in debt, was destroyed. Miss Cushman then secured an engagement in Albany, where she acted for five months, and made many acquaintances among politicians through her relative, Gov. Marcy, then in the U. S. senate. Convinced that she had not served a proper apprenticeship in her art, she applied to the manager of the Park theatre for any place that might be vacant, was engaged to do general utility business, and soon made her mark as a leading actress. This engagement lasted from 1837 till 1840. In 1842 she assumed the management of the Walnut street theatre in Philadelphia, which she retained till 1844, when she accompanied Mr. Macready on a tour in the northern states, in the course of which she undertook the higher range of tragic parts with great success. She was an ardent student, and rapidly added new characters to her list, such as Elvira, Bianca, Helen McGregor, Emilia, Queen Katherine, Cardinal Woolsey, Ophelia, Pauline, Viola, and Katherine in “Taming of the Shrew.” She was powerful and electric in tragedy, masterful in the depicting of every passion, great in Shakespearian characters, and in her young days was distinguished as a performer in high comedy parts. On 26 Oct., 1844, Miss Cushman sailed for England. In London she immediately achieved a triumphant success in the parts of Lady Macbeth, Rosalind, Mrs. Haller, Bianca in “Fazio,” and Emilia. She sent for her family, and began her second season at the Haymarket as Romeo, a part she had chosen in order to bring out her sister as Juliet. The power of her impersonation created a sensation in London, and afterward in Dublin, while her sister's grace and beauty added to the success. She played other male companion parts with her sister, achieved a great success as Julia in “The Hunchback,” Meg Merrilies, a part that she had first performed at the Park theatre, New York, in 1841, Nancy Sykes, Lady Gay Spanker, and other characters, constantly added to her professional reputation, and made warm friends in the intellectual society of England. In August, 1849, she returned to the United States and played throughout the country. She took her farewell at the Broadway theatre, 15 May, 1852, visited friends in England, and travelled on the continent, but began playing again in December, 1853. Her house in Mayfair became a centre of artistic and literary society, and during the dramatic season she acted with undiminished popularity in London and the provinces, while part of her winters she passed in Rome. In 1857 she returned to the United States and performed during the winter and the spring of 1858, and returned to Rome, establishing herself in a spacious permanent winter home in January, 1859. In 1860 she again acted in New York, and appeared on several occasions for the benefit of the Sanitary commission. During the last six year's of her life Miss Cushman developed a remarkable ability as a dramatic reader, giving scenes from Shakespeare, ballad poetry, dialect poems, and humorous pieces with a success not less decided than her early histrionic triumphs. In 1871, after a residence in Europe, she resumed her career in the United States as a reader, besides fulfilling several dramatic engagements. Her farewell appearance was announced at least seven times in as many different years. Her final performance in New York at Booth's theatre, where she played the part of Lady Macbeth, was signalized by social and literary demonstrations. She took a similar demonstrative farewell in the same character in Philadelphia and other cities, and her career closed in Boston, at the Globe theatre, on 15 May, 1875. After a reading-tour to Rochester, Buffalo, and Syracuse, she retired with a large fortune to her villa at Newport, where she was seized with her final illness, and in October went to Boston and placed herself under medical treatment. An obelisk copied from Cleopatra's Needle was placed over her tomb in Mount Auburn cemetery in 1880. See “Charlotte Cushman, her Letters and Memories of her Life,” edited by Emma Stebbins, the sculptor, who was her intimate friend and companion at Rome for several years (Boston, 1878). — Her sister, Susan Webb, b. in Boston, Mass., 17 March, 1822; d. in Liverpool, England, 10 May, 1859, made her début on the stage in April, 1837, at the Park theatre, New York city, as Laura Castelli in Epes Sargent's play, “The Genoese,” and achieved an immediate success. She played Desdemona to George Vandenhoff's Othello, Grace Harkaway to her sister's Lady Gay Spanker, and other prominent parts in New York and Philadelphia, and made a remarkable success in “Satan in Paris.” In England her impersonation of Ophelia was regarded as of the first rank, her Juliet ran 200 nights, and in her old and many new characters her acting was greatly admired for its grace and delicacy. In 1847 she retired from the stage, and in March, 1848, married Dr. James Sheridan Muspratt, of Liverpool, the distinguished chemist and author.8283
Birth: 
Jul. 23, 1816
Boston
Suffolk County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: 
Feb. 18, 1876
Boston
Suffolk County
Massachusetts, USA

Actress. Born in Boston Massachusetts, she is known as the first American born international star. She first attempted a career in opera but voice troubles forced her to look to acting. In 1836 she received rave reviews for her debut performance as Lady Macbeth. She went on to star as Meg Merrilies in "Guy Mannering" and Nancy Sykes in "Oliver Twist." In 1845 she went to London and was a success in her role as Bianca in the play "Fazio." While there she also received critical acclaim for her role as Romeo in "Romeo and Juliet". In fact, she played more than thirty masculine roles during her career. In 1852 she retired to Italy a bona fide international star. She returned to the United States in 1870 after being diagnosed with breast cancer. In 1874, despite her illness, she made several farewell performances, reciting readings because she was too weak to perform in plays. She was honored with fireworks and parades. After her farewell tour she returned to her hometown to live out the rest of her days.

Charlotte Saunders Cushman was an American stage actress.

Charlotte Cushman was the eldest of the four children of Elkanah and Mary Eliza Babbitt Cushman of Boston, Massachusetts. Her father was said to have had a Puritan ancestor who came to America on the Mayflower.

She was one of the most famous actresses of her day, enjoying success on the stage in both the United States and Britain. Her repertoire encompassed a wide range of parts, including male roles such as Romeo. A commanding presence both on and offstage, Cushman used her fortune and fame to champion the work of other women artists.

She trained to be an opera singer. Her professional debut as Countess Almaviva in Mozart's Marriage of Figaro in April 1835 in Boston received generally favorable response.

Cushman turned to James Barton, the leading actor at the St. Charles Theater, to coach her as an actress.

On April 23, 1836, she debuted as Lady Macbeth. Her interpretation of the role was much more energetic and powerful than was customary at the time. Spectators and critics reacted favorably to her performance.

She was responsible for the support of her family and sought other sources of income. Through correspondence, she became friends with Sarah Josepha Hale, the editor of Godey's Lady Book. Short stories and poetry by Cushman were published in the Lady Book and also in the Ladies Companion magazine.

Cushman scored a success in Albany, New York, where she again portrayed Lady Macbeth and also performed several male roles. Local drama critic Henry Dickinson commented that "her stately form, rather masculine contour of countenance, and powerful voice admirably adapted her to the line of male characters."

After the Albany season ended, Cushman again sought work on the more prestigious New York City stage. Hired at the Park Theater as a "walking lady," she was called upon to fill in at the last minute as the gypsy Meg Merrilies in Guy Mannering. Her approach to the role was creative and risky: Cushman's Meg Merrilies was a physically unattractive yet powerful old crone. The effect was startling to her audience and her fellow actors alike, and the performance was a triumph.

Appearing as she did, Cushman was playing to her strength. She was not a conventionally beautiful woman. Tall and robust with a square face, lantern jaw and heavy brows, she relied not on feminine prettiness but rather on energy and wit to appeal to spectators.

In 1837 Cushman had the opportunity to play opposite Edwin Forrest, one of the most prominent American actors. When Forrest finished his appearance at the Park Theater, Cushman took over one of his roles, that of the lover Claude Melnotte in Edward Bulwer-Lytton's The Lady of Lyons.

The same season Cushman played Nancy Sykes, the impoverished prostitute in Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist. To prepare for the role, she lived for several days in the slums of New York's Lower East Side. She even acquired ragged clothing from the women that she met there in order to make her costume more authentic.

In 1842 Cushman became the manager of Philadelphia's Walnut Street Theater, an unusual job for a woman. Cushman stated that her mission as manager was to "offer this community those good old plays that have secured the approval of the public, and which may be seen with advantage and pleasure as they excite a healthy tone of feeling by their morality and generous sentiments."

An important development in Cushman's career occurred when William Charles Macready, the celebrated British actor, asked that she play opposite him when he came to Philadelphia on an American tour. The pairing was a success, and the two went on to perform in New York.

Success on the British stage was considered essential for a Shakespearean actor, a tour of England was important to Cushman's career.

In England Cushman signed to appear with Edwin Forrest. Ever aware of the importance of public perception, however, she insisted on playing a starring role without him before they acted together. A critic for the London Sun said of her performance, "Since the memorable first appearance of Edmund Kean in 1814, never has there been such a debut on the boards of an English theatre."

In 1874 she made a series of farewell performances, doing readings rather than plays, for which she no longer had the stamina. At her appearance in New York, William Cullen Bryant recited an ode in her honor, and the show was followed by a parade on Fifth Avenue and a fireworks display.

She died in Boston of breast cancer. (bio by: Bigwoo) 256

(10) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.2 CHARLES LATHROP AUGUSTUS CUSHMAN 13875,13871, 2019
Birth14 Nov 1818, Boston, Sufflolk Co., MA13871
Death1896, age: 7713876
FlagsGen #8
(Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Son of Elkanah Cushman and Mary Eliza (Babbit) Cushman. At age 16, he went to the East Indies, for the benefit of his health,and afterwards to the West Indies. He was three years in the Texas Navy as Commodore’s secretary, and for ten years past he has been a Surveyor in a public office in London, England, where he now resides. He is unmarried.13871

(10) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.3 FITZ HENRY CUSHMAN 13871, 2020
BirthJul 182013871
Death24 Oct 1821, Boston, Suffolk Co., MA, age: 113871
BurialForest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain, Suffolk Co. MA13856
FlagsGen #8
(Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Son of Elkanah Cushman and Mary Eliza (Babbit) Cushman. Re-interred 16 May 1851 from Copp’s Hill.13855

(10) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a SUSAN WEBB CUSHMAN* 13871, 5974
Birth17 Mar 1822, Boston, Suffolk Co, MA13871,264,93
Birth Memoor 1825
Death10 May 1859, Liverpool, Merseyside, England, age: 37264,13870,5170
BurialCremated, Ashes scattered256
FlagsGen #8
(Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of Elkanah Cushman and Mary Eliza (Babbit) Cushman.

She was one of four daughter of Elkanah and Mary Eliza Bobbett Cushman. She was an accomplished actress and the sister of Charlotte Saunders Cushman.

Susan W. Cushman fist appeared on the theatrical stage in NYC in 1837, acted in Europe and American, retired from the stage in Liverpool, England in 1847. Her biography has been published in the “Theatrical Journal”, a periodical published in England, dated 30 Mar 1848. Bio appears in HW Cushman book. 13877 Had three children. By her first husband, she had Edwin. By her second husband she had Rosalie Cushman, Muspratt b 23 Oct 1848 and Ida Blance Muspratt, b. 25 Sep 1851. d. 23 Jun 1854.11038 She may have had one more daughter.13878 An extensive biography appears in Dictionary of American Biography which is available on the web at http://ia331319.us.archive.org/2/items/dictionaryo...yofamer019311mbp.pdf5170

CUSHMAN, Charlotte Saunders, actress, b. in Boston, Mass., 23 July, 1816; d. there, 18 Feb., 1876. She was a descendant in the eighth generation from Robert Cushman. Her father rose from poverty to be a successful West India merchant, but lost his fortune, and died, leaving his family in straitened circumstances. Charlotte was a remarkably bright, sportive child, excelling her schoolmates and developing a voice of remarkable compass and richness, with a full contralto register. Two friends of her father, one of them John Mackey, in whose piano factory Jonas Chickering was then foreman, provided her with the best musical instruction. She sang in choirs, and aided in the support of the family from the age of twelve. When Mrs. Joseph Wood visited Boston in 1834, Capt. Mackey introduced Miss Cushman, who sang with her in two of her concerts. Through Mrs. Wood's influence she became an articled pupil to James G. Maeder, that lady's musical director, and under his instruction made her first appearance in opera in the Tremont theatre as the Countess Almaviva in the “Marriage of Figaro” with great success, and her second as Lucy Bertram in “Guy Mannering.” She went with his company to New Orleans, where her voice, which had been strained by the soprano parts assigned to her, suddenly failed. Seeking the counsel of James H. Caldwell, manager of the principal theatre of New Orleans, she was advised by him and by Barton, the tragedian, to become an actress, and given the part of Lady Macbeth to study, in which she made her appearance with complete success in 1835. Going to New York, she declined a trial at the Park theatre, to enter into a three years' engagement with Thomas Hamblin, of the Bowery theatre, where she appeared for a season in leading tragic roles. Miss Cushman brought her mother, who had supported the family by keeping a boarding-house, to New York; but soon after this the theatre was burned, and her wardrobe, for which she was in debt, was destroyed. Miss Cushman then secured an engagement in Albany, where she acted for five months, and made many acquaintances among politicians through her relative, Gov. Marcy, then in the U. S. senate. Convinced that she had not served a proper apprenticeship in her art, she applied to the manager of the Park theatre for any place that might be vacant, was engaged to do general utility business, and soon made her mark as a leading actress. This engagement lasted from 1837 till 1840. In 1842 she assumed the management of the Walnut street theatre in Philadelphia, which she retained till 1844, when she accompanied Mr. Macready on a tour in the northern states, in the course of which she undertook the higher range of tragic parts with great success. She was an ardent student, and rapidly added new characters to her list, such as Elvira, Bianca, Helen McGregor, Emilia, Queen Katherine, Cardinal Woolsey, Ophelia, Pauline, Viola, and Katherine in “Taming of the Shrew.” She was powerful and electric in tragedy, masterful in the depicting of every passion, great in Shakespearian characters, and in her young days was distinguished as a performer in high comedy parts. On 26 Oct., 1844, Miss Cushman sailed for England. In London she immediately achieved a triumphant success in the parts of Lady Macbeth, Rosalind, Mrs. Haller, Bianca in “Fazio,” and Emilia. She sent for her family, and began her second season at the Haymarket as Romeo, a part she had chosen in order to bring out her sister as Juliet. The power of her impersonation created a sensation in London, and afterward in Dublin, while her sister's grace and beauty added to the success. She played other male companion parts with her sister, achieved a great success as Julia in “The Hunchback,” Meg Merrilies, a part that she had first performed at the Park theatre, New York, in 1841, Nancy Sykes, Lady Gay Spanker, and other characters, constantly added to her professional reputation, and made warm friends in the intellectual society of England. In August, 1849, she returned to the United States and played throughout the country. She took her farewell at the Broadway theatre, 15 May, 1852, visited friends in England, and travelled on the continent, but began playing again in December, 1853. Her house in Mayfair became a centre of artistic and literary society, and during the dramatic season she acted with undiminished popularity in London and the provinces, while part of her winters she passed in Rome. In 1857 she returned to the United States and performed during the winter and the spring of 1858, and returned to Rome, establishing herself in a spacious permanent winter home in January, 1859. In 1860 she again acted in New York, and appeared on several occasions for the benefit of the Sanitary commission. During the last six year's of her life Miss Cushman developed a remarkable ability as a dramatic reader, giving scenes from Shakespeare, ballad poetry, dialect poems, and humorous pieces with a success not less decided than her early histrionic triumphs. In 1871, after a residence in Europe, she resumed her career in the United States as a reader, besides fulfilling several dramatic engagements. Her farewell appearance was announced at least seven times in as many different years. Her final performance in New York at Booth's theatre, where she played the part of Lady Macbeth, was signalized by social and literary demonstrations. She took a similar demonstrative farewell in the same character in Philadelphia and other cities, and her career closed in Boston, at the Globe theatre, on 15 May, 1875. After a reading-tour to Rochester, Buffalo, and Syracuse, she retired with a large fortune to her villa at Newport, where she was seized with her final illness, and in October went to Boston and placed herself under medical treatment. An obelisk copied from Cleopatra's Needle was placed over her tomb in Mount Auburn cemetery in 1880. See “Charlotte Cushman, her Letters and Memories of her Life,” edited by Emma Stebbins, the sculptor, who was her intimate friend and companion at Rome for several years (Boston, 1878). — Her sister, Susan Webb, b. in Boston, Mass., 17 March, 1822; d. in Liverpool, England, 10 May, 1859, made her début on the stage in April, 1837, at the Park theatre, New York city, as Laura Castelli in Epes Sargent's play, “The Genoese,” and achieved an immediate success. She played Desdemona to George Vandenhoff's Othello, Grace Harkaway to her sister's Lady Gay Spanker, and other prominent parts in New York and Philadelphia, and made a remarkable success in “Satan in Paris.” In England her impersonation of Ophelia was regarded as of the first rank, her Juliet ran 200 nights, and in her old and many new characters her acting was greatly admired for its grace and delicacy. In 1847 she retired from the stage, and in March, 1848, married Dr. James Sheridan Muspratt, of Liverpool, the distinguished chemist and author.8283

CUSHMAN, SUSAN WEBB (Mar. 17, 1822-
May 10, 1859), actress, was born in Boston, the
daughter of Elkanah Cushman and Mary Eliza
Babbitt, and a younger sister of Charlotte Cush-
man [#.v.]. She remained a younger sister all
her professional life, under the protection, and
the shadow, of the maternal but mighty Char-
lotte. She and her mother accompanied the elder
sister to New York and Albany in 1836, when
Charlotte was getting her feet on the profes-
sional ladder, and a year later she made her own
debut as Laura in Epes Sargent's play, The
Genoese. She was then only fifteen, but in those
days the child actor was more admired than at
present and her success was considerable. It is
recorded (H. W. Cushman, A Plistorical and
Biographical Genealogy of the Cushtnans, 1855,
p. 511), that she was married, Mar. 14, 1836,
to Nelson M, Meriman, in Boston, and that she
was left destitute by him, with an infant, and took
up acting at her sister's advice, as a means of
livelihood. Later she acted Grace Harkaway to
Charlotte's Lady Gay Spanker, both in New
York and Philadelphia, probably in 1841 or 1842,
was acclaimed in Satan in Paris, and appeared
as Desdemona to the Othello of George Van-
denhoff, a man of culture and not apparently
much given to over-heated eulogies. He later
wrote an autobiographical book, called Leaves
irom an Actor's Note-Book, which contains
many criticisms of elder players, valuable to-day
for their evident cool-headedness and penetra-
tion. Among others is one of Susan Cushman,
as well as many of her greater sister. In 1842
Charlotte was stage manager of the Walnut
Street Theatre, Philadelphia, and Susan was
also a member of the company. Vandenhoff gave
six performances with them, receiving $180 as
his share for the six nights. "Susan," he wrote,
"was a pretty creature, but had not a spark of
Charlotte's genius; she pleased 'the fellows/
however, and was the best walking-lady on the
American stage. (Walking-ladies, madam, are
not pedestrians, necessarily; it is the English
term for what they call on the French stage, in-
genues; young ladies of no particular strength of
character, whose business is to look pretty, to



Cushny 1

dress prettily, and to speak prettily; charming-
ly innocent, and deliriously insipid.)"

In 1845, Charlotte went to England to seek
acclaim there, hoping thus to better her position
at home, and took Susan with her. She had
already played Romeo in America, and now stud-
ied the play again with Susan as Juliet, and the
two sisters presented this tragedy to London, at
the Haymarket, Dec. 30, 1845. They insisted on
using the original version, not the theatre prompt
copy, and for so doing the vexed company called
them "American Indians." The play ran eighty
nights in London, and was then taken on a tour
of England, with success. Miss Stebbins says
that Charlotte chose this play, to effect her sis-
ter's debut, so that her sister could have the right
support, but the statement is a trifle naive. Char-
lotte was a good showman, and she also enjoyed
assuming masculine roles. In the numerous re-
views of this production, most of the comment
is concerned with Charlotte's Romeo, but sev-
eral critics spoke pleasantly of "the grace and
delicacy" of Susan's acting, and Sheridan
Knowles, amid his raptures over Charlotte's Ro-
meo, found breath to speak of the first scene as
"admirably personated by her beautiful sister."
The sisters also played Twelfth Night together.
A further record of Susan's theatrical career in
England is found in the Autobiography of Anna
Cora Mowatt (pp. 273 ff .) . In 1848 Mrs. Mowatt
was to appear in London in The Lady of Lyons,
and Susan Cushman was engaged for Helen.
She did not appear at the first rehearsal, and the
manager was furious. He persuaded another
actress to try the role, but as the next rehearsal
was about to begin, in walked Susan. It was
now her turn to be furious. "An angry scene en-
sued," wrote Mrs. Mowatt, "such as I never be-
fore, and I rejoice to say never after, witnessed
in a theatre." But Susan lost in the encounter,
and was forced to leave the house. Her sister
would have surely remained. Later that same
year, Susan married Dr. James Sheridan Mus-
pratt, 'a distinguished chemist and author" of
Liverpool, and retired from the stage. She died
in Liverpool, May 10, 1859. 5170

She was one of four daughter of Elkanah and Mary Eliza Bobbett Cushman. She was an accomplished actress and the sister of Charlotte Saunders Cushman.

She made her acting debut in April 1837 at the Park theatre, New York city, as Laura Castelli in Epes Sargent's play, "The Genoese," and achieved an immediate success. She played Desdemona to George Vandenhoff's Othello, Grace Harkaway to her sister's Lady Gay Spanker, and other prominent parts in New York and Philadelphia, and made a remarkable success in "Satan in Paris." In England her impersonation of Ophelia was regarded as of the first rank, her Juliet ran 200 nights, and in her old and many new characters her acting was greatly admired for its grace and delicacy. In 1847 she retired from the stage, and in March, 1848, married Dr. James Sheridan Muspratt, of Liverpool, the distinguished chemist and author.1622
SpouseNELSON M. MERIMAN13871 , 5975
Birthca 176913868
Death17 Nov 1848, St. Louis, MO, age: 7913868
BurialCentenary Methodist Cemetery, St. Louis, St Louis, MO13868
Jonathan Coddington believes he was b ca 1769 and died ca 1848 somewhere near St. Louis, MO. He married Susan Webb when she was 14 years old and reportedly abandoned her when she was pregnant with Edwin Charles Cushman. The Coddington Genealogy says: "H. W. Cushman states that Susan married Merriman on 14 Mar 1836 (Historical and Biogeographical Genealogy, p. 511), but Charlotte attested to the November 4 date (George Combe to CC, 9 February 1846, NLS, MS 7390:295). Sometime after Merriman abandoned Susan, he apparently disappeared. Howitt reported that Susan had been granted a divorce decree in the early or mid-1840s on the grounds of Merriman's desertion and that he died month's later, "somewhere in the Far West,." In 1851 Charlotte received a letter from a friend of Merriman's in St. Louis claiming that Merriman had died on November 17, 1848--considerably after Charlotte had indicated (E. Keener to CC, 1851, CCP, vol. 12)."

and...
"As for Susan, there was further cause to be happy these days. When Nelson Merriman's Philadelphia relatives learned how shabbily he had treated his wife, they offered to pay the full costs if Susan would sue for divorce. The decree was granted on grounds of desertion, and within a few months word came that Merriman had died "somewhere in the Far West."


Marriage 1 Susan Webb CUSHMAN b: 17 Mar 1822 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts, USA
• Married: 14 Mar 1836 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts, USA
• Note: Married in Trinity Church, Bostons
• Event: Alt. Marriage 4 Nov 1836 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts, USA 13868
Family ID4097
Marriage14 Mar 1836, Boston, Suffolk Co., MA13871,13879
Marr Memoor 4 Nov 1836, Trinity Church, Boston,
Divorced some where between 1940 and 1844 inBoston, Suffolk Co. MA13880
ChildrenEDWIN CHARLES “NED” Sr. , 6904 (1838-1909)

Other spouses: Prof. JAMES SHERIDAN MUSPRATT

(11) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1 EDWIN CHARLES “NED” CUSHMAN Sr. 13836,13881,13873, 6904
Birth4 Mar 1838, NYC, NY13836
Death5 Mar 1909, Rome, Italy, age: 7113836,13882
Death Memoor 1914-pneumonia
BurialMt Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex Co. MA - cremation13883
FlagsNo Connect, of Meriman
Charles Carlino Cushman was born on 4 March 1838 in New York City to Susan Webb Cushman. His father, Nelson M Merriman, abandoned his mother before he was born and he was adopted by his wealthy aunt, stage actress Charlotte Cushman. She changed his name to Edwin Charles Cushman and called him "Ned".

He was educated at the US Naval Academy, 1852-56.

Ned married actress Emma Conn Crow on 3 April 1861 in St Louis, Missouri. They had five sons: Wayman, Allerton Seward, Edwin Charles "Carlino" Jr, Victor Nilsson, and Guy Cushman.

In 1865, Ned worked at the US Consolate in Italy. The family moved back to St Louis before the 1870 US Census and by 1880, Ned was working as an iron dealer in Newport, Rhode Island.

Ned Cushman died of pneumonia, 5 March 1909, aged 71, in Rome, Italy, and was buried with his wife at Mt Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Photo of stone at Find A Grave.256


The famous actress, Charlotte Cushman, formally adopted Edwin Charles when his mother remarried and made him her exclusive heir. He therefore assumed the surname Cushman. 1880 census shows him as an Iron Manufacturer living in home of Wayman Crow, Enumeration District 371, St. Louis, St. Louis, MO.13884
Photo of stone at Find A Grave.13881Charles Carlino Cushman was born on 4 March 1838 in New York City to Susan Webb Cushman. His father, Nelson M Merriman, abandoned his mother before he was born and he was adopted by his wealthy aunt, stage actress Charlotte Cushman. She changed his name to Edwin Charles Cushman and called him "Ned". He was educated at the US Naval Academy, 1852-56.
Ned married actress Emma Conn Crow on 3 April 1861 in St Louis, Missouri. They had five sons: Wayman, Allerton Seward, Edwin Charles "Carlino" Jr, Victor Nilsson, and Guy Cushman. In 1865, Ned worked at the US Consolate in Italy. The family moved back to St Louis before the 1870 US Census and by 1880, Ned was working as an iron dealer in Newport, Rhode Island. Ned Cushman died of pneumonia, 5 March 1909, aged 71, in Rome, Italy, and was buried with his wife at Mt Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.88 Photo of stone at Find A Grave.13883

Other notes. He inherited ca $600,000 from Charlotte Saunders Cushman, but as a trust in his name.. He was adopted by Charoltte Cushman and his name was changed to Cushman by the New York state legislature, 1851. 13885

• His obituary was published on 6 Mar 1909 in New York, New York Co., New York, USA.26 ST. LOUIS, March 6.-Relatives here of Edwin C. Cushman, former United States Minister to Italy. received word to-day of Mr. Cushman's death In Rome, Italy. Mr. Cushman was appointed to the diplomatic service by President Lincoln in 1860 and served eleven years. He had spent much of the last fifteen years abroad, living when in the United States at Crows Nest, Bar Harbor, Me. He was born seventy years ago, arid on being left an orphan was adopted by his aunt. Charlotte Cushman, the celebrated actress. His wife was a daughter of Wayman Crow, a St. Louis educator and philanthropist. Mr. Cushman is survived by four sons, Charles, a professor at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania; Guy; a Captain in the Fourth United States Cavalry, and Wayman and Victor Cushman of New York.

FindAGrave also has him buried Camp Cestio, Rome, Provincia di Roma, Lazio, Italy, Pl0t 1944. That record has him b. 1 Jan 1939, NY d 6 Mar 1909.13886
SpouseEMMA CONN CROW13887,13888,13873,13889 , 7373
Birth3 Apr 1839, St. Louis, St. Louis Co. MO13890,13868
Death15 Sep 1920, Bar Harbor, Hancock Co ME, age: 8113891,13868
BurialMt Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, cremation13891,13883
ResidenceNewport, Newport, RI13889
Daughter of Charlotte Cushmans’ business agent in St. Louis, Wayman Crow and wife Isabella Buck (Conn) Crow13892,13893 She may have written the book “Insight: A Record of Psychic Experiences. A Series of Questions and Answers Align with the...1918” isbn-13-9780554485508. Published by Christopher, 1918. Download available at http://www.archive.org/details/insightarecordp00cusgoog
She also wrote verse: See: Shadows in the glass, Boston, Christopher Publishing house. Photo of stone at Find A Grave.13883

Emma Conn Crow
was born on 3 April 1839 in St Louis, Missouri, to philanthropist Wayman Crow and his wife, Isabella Buck Conn. As a nineteen-year-old fledgling actress, Emma began an affair with much older Charlotte Cushman, a famous stage actress. With her lover's encouragement, she married Edwin Charles "Ned" Cushman, Charlotte's nephew and adopted son, on 3 April 1861, in St Louis. Ned and Emma had five sons: Wayman, Allerton Seward, Edwin Charles "Carlino" Jr, Victor Nilsson, and Guy Cushman. The family lived in Rome where Ned worked at the US Consolate in Italy. They moved back to St Louis before the 1870 US Census and by 1880, they were living in Newport, Rhode Island. Late in life, Emma penned, "Insight; A Record of Psychic Experiences: A Series of Questions and Answers Dealing with the World of Facts, the World of Ideals and the World of Real." Emma Crow Cushman died of pneumonia, 15 September 1920, aged 81, in Bar Harbor, Maine, and was buried with her husband at Mt Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.13883

Emma (Conn) (nee)Crow CUSHMAN {US} (F: 1839 Apr 3 - 1920 Sep 15)
What Is Theosophy? [n|1883]
Insight (anon) [n|1918]
Shadows In The Glass [n|1920]510
Family ID4748
MarriageMar 1861, Boston, MA13894,13868
Marr Memoor 3 Apr 1861, St Louis, MO
ChildrenWAYMAN CROW MD , 7374 (1864-1921)
 ALLERTON SEWARD , 7376 (1867-1930)
 EDWIN CHARLES Jr. , 7382 (1867-1907)
 VICTOR NILSSON , 7385 (1872-1933)
 Col. GUY , 7386 (1878-1937)

(12) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1.1 WAYMAN CROW CUSHMAN MD 13895,13888,13873,13889,39, 7374
BirthSep 1864, Manchester, England13896,13868,39
Birth Memoor Altrincham, Chesire, England
Death14 Apr 1921, Hagerstown, Washington Co., MD, age: 5613897,13868,13868
Death MemoHeart Attack; or 1923 (Coddington)
BurialMount Auburn Cemetery, ambridge, Middlesex Co. MA1622
ResidenceNewport, Newport, RI13889
FlagsNo Connect, of Meriman
Photo of stone at Find a Grave.1622

NWMP records at Lake Bennett: people who entered the Yukon via boats

Name
Date
Boat
CUSHMAN, E.C.
May 18, 1898
St. Louis, MO - boat 41
(This is probably Edwin Charles Cushman, Jr., by Nov 1867. He died in 1908 and had a daughter named Violet, b. 1891 in St. Louis, MO)
CUSHMAN, W.C.
May 18, 1898
St. Louis, MO - boat 41
Edwin Charles Cushman had a brother named Wayman Crow, b. 1864, who died in 1921 and had two sons, b dates unknown. This might be our W.C. Cushman. They traveled together.

1880 census has him as Waymen Cushman b. 1865, England, living in Newport Newport, RI, a Student.13898 There also is record of a Wayman C. Cushman on the new York Passenger Arrival List (Ellis Island) 1892-1924, that shows emigration to vera Curz, Mexico 22 Jun 1907-New York. There is another entry dated 3 April 1909-New York, that shows a Wayman Cushman emigration to Vera Cruz, Mexico.

http://www.gold-rush.org/cgi-bin/goldrush/search.cfm
NWMP records at Lake Bennett: people who entered the Yukon via boats
(The second of three volumes of Lake Bennett records maintained by the North West Mounted Police. These records list the names and boat numbers of stampeders embarking on the Yukon River trip from Lake Bennett to Dawson City. Led by legendary Mountie Sam Steele, the North West Mounted Police contingent at Lake Bennett worked painstakingly to keep track of the flotilla of 7,000 boats, skows, barges and rafts.)
Date, Name, Checkpoint Entered
May 18, 1898 CUSHMAN, W.C. St. Louis, MO - boat 41
May 18, 1898 CUSHMAN, E. C. St. Louis, MO - boat 41
and also..
NWMP records at Lake Bennett: people who entered the Yukon via boats (NWMP Dawson Docks (4,694 records). Just as they kept track of Chilkoot crossings and boats built at Lake Bennett, the North West Mounted Police maintained records of individuals arriving at and leaving Dawson City on Yukon River steamships. These dockside archives list ships such as the S. S. Nora, S. S. Leaver, S. S. Bailey and SS Australian as INWARDS or OUTWARDS (bound).)
Date, Name, Checkpoint Entered
June 29 1899 CUSHMAN, W.C. S. S. CLIFFORD SIFTON - OUTWARDS
and also...
Placer mining Applications Vol 1
Name, Claim number, Microfilm number, Year Recorded
CUSHMAN, A 9654 05 1901
CUSHMAN, A 35577 10 1900-1901
CUSHMAN, A 65889, 65978 16 1901-1904
CUSHMAN, C 18497 06 1898-1901
CUSHMAN, W 58, 59 03 1898-1899

and also...
Placer mining Grants Vol. 3 (19,259 records)
The third of three "Placer mining Grants Volumes."
After gold was discovered in 1896 on Bonanza Creek, thousands of claims were staked along tributaries of the Yukon and Klondike Rivers. The Yukon Gold Commissioner's Office issued "Placer mining Grants," enabling prospectors to become miners and work their claims for "placer" findings (mineral deposits containing gold, left by glaciers or rivers ). This, the first of three Placer mining Grants volumes, lists almost 20,000 numbered grants and the names of their owners
Name, Claim number, Microfilm number, Year recorded
CUSHMAN, W 58, 59 3 1898-1899
CUSHMAN, A 9654 5 1901
CUSHMAN, C 18497 6 1898-1901
CUSHMAN, A 35577 10 1900-1901
CUSHMAN, A 65889, 65978 16 1901-190413868


Hi Rob: I have an interesting story for you, I think.  Sandy and I took a combined land and cruise tour to Alaska this summer. When we were in Dawson, I visited a museum and, since I am in the habit of looking for Cushmans everywhere I go, I got some help with some land records at the Museum. I found some Klondike gold rush Placer Claims for three Cushmans and was able to get photocopies of them. When I returned home, I looked at more online records at some Yukon genealogy sites, got a little more info, then tried to link the names to the Cushman genealogy.

I think I have found evidence of two Cushman/Merrimans in your line:  Edward Charles Cushman (b. Nov 1867)  and his brother, Wayman Crow Cushman (b. Sep 1864) traveled to the Yukon via either up from Dyea via the famed Chilkoot Trail  or up from Skagway via the White Pass. 

The evidence comes from old records kept by the North West Mounted Police (NWMP). They had checkpoints along the routes to the gold fields. These were established to collect duty on incoming goods but, more importantly, to make sure every "stampeder" had adequate provisions. "Adequate" meant each person had to have at least one ton of goods. (It took several trips up and over the passes to do this!). 

The NWMP records at the Lake Bennett checkpoint lists E.C. Cushman  and W.C. Cushman of St. Louis, MO on boat 41, both arriving 18 May 1898. I believe E.C. Cushman is probably Edwin Charles Cushman, Jr, b. Nov 1867, d. 1908, and W. C. Cushman is his brother Wayman Crow Cushman, b. 1864, d. 1921.You can look at the record at: http://www.yukongenealogy.com/cgi_bin/databases/quick.asp?query=Cushman&Go=Go  Note that W.C. Cushman left the Yukon through this same checkpoint on June 29, 1899 via the S.S. Clifford Smith.

At this same site, you will see record of Placer mining Applications, Vol. 1, showing claims # 58 and 59. I have copies of these and they clearly reference a Wyman Cushman.  The claims listed as "A. Cushman" turn our to be claims filed by an Adrian Earl Cushman, of Tacoma, WA, who I believe is in the Cushman genealogy as Adrian Earl Cushman, b. 1868, Thornapple, Barry Co., MI, son of Amariah Fenton Cushman and Lydia Clarice Updegraff. I have not been able to identify who "C. Cushman" might be.

The book by V. B. Cushman that you sent me confirms that Edwin C. Cushman, Jr. went off to the gold rush, (p. 209). Nicknamed “Carlino” “Edwin C. Cushman, Jr., nicknamed “Carlino” was an adventurer. He left his family to participate in the Alaska Gold Rush. Subsequently, he discovered a tribe of  hirtherto unknown Indians in Colorado, some of whom he brought to the World’s Fair in St. Louis in 1898. From them he contracted tuberculosis from which he died.”

It may be of interest to see that other Cushmans are also listed at other sources within this site:

 An "A.G. Cushman" turns out to be Alfred G. Cushman, originally of Otsego, MI, who is probably in the Cushman line, but I have no record of him in the genealogy, yet.  And, it appears there were two Cushmans from Delta, Colorado, an R. Cushman and a Mrs. A. Cushman. I do have record of some Cushmans in Colorado during that era and they were engaged in prospecting, there. Still have not linked them to this record, though.

The trails to the Yukon that Edwin Charles Cushman and his brother, Wayman Crow Cushman probably took are described here:

Trails to the Gold Rush, White Pass and Chilkoot Pass -See: http://www.postalmuseum.si.edu/gold/trail.htm 
You will also find an interesting description of what these men must have gone through to get to the Klondike, written by one of their contemporaries. See: http://www.skyways.org/museums/funston/chilpass.html
And, there are some wonderful old photos that show people trudging over the Chilkook pass. I will attach a couple of examples to this e-mail and also try to insert them here. (Let me know if you cannot view them. I can send them separately.) It is amazing what these men went through to get to the Gold fields! (E-mail from Robert Cushman 25 Jul 2009)

Note Wayman had two sons, Henry and Robert, birth dates unknown, and a Henry and R. Cushman show up in the Yukon. This may be a stretch but is a possibility.
SpouseMARY SEMPLE AMES13896,13899,558,13900 , 7375
Birth9 Aug 1865, St. Louis, MO558,13868
Death30 Jan 1943, La Jolla, San Diego Co., CA, age: 77558
BurialBellefontaine Cemetery, Saint Louis, St. Louis City, MO13901
Photo of stone at Find A Grave. 13901Of St. Louis, MO 13896 She was a member of the Illinois State Historical Library.
Note, Her husband may have been a traveler to Dawson, Yukon Territory. See notes on Yukon Cushmans. Her parents were Edgar Ames of St. Louis and Lucy Virgina (Semple) Ames.55811880 has a Mary Semple Ames b. 1864 MO in 10th ward, precinct 103, St. Louis, MO. IGI has b. 1865 with death 30 Jan 1943, La Jolla, San Diego, CA. Spouse Wayman Crow Cushman, Dr. Marriage about 1894, Christ Church Cathedral. This is probably the woman who wrote: She Wrote It All Down. By Cushman, Mary Ames. The diary of an eleven-year old-girl on her grand tour of Europe in the 1870's. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1936. Hardbound. Blue cloth. Very good. No dust jacket. 5.75x8.25". 226 pages. Note she was living in the household of L.V.S. Ames, her mother (Lucy Virginia Semple ) in 1910.13902 “Mary Semple Ames, second daughter, third child of Edgar Ames and his wife, Lucy Virginia Semple, b. St Louis MO on August 9 1864; married October 15, 1890 at “Notchcliff”, Jersey County, IL Dr. Weyman Crow Cushman of St. Louis. Two Children: Henry Semple Cushman, born August 6, 1892 at Bar Harbor, Maine; and, Robert Allerton Cushman, born July 19, 1893, at “Notchcliff”. IL.”13903

Mary (nee)Ames CUSHMAN {US} (F: 1865 Aug 9 - 1943 Jan 30)
She Wrote It All Down [a|1936]510
Family ID5119
Marriage15 Oct 1890, Christ Church Cathedral “Notchcliff” New Jersey558,13868,13868,13903
Marr MemoMarriage ended in divorce.
ChildrenHENRY Semple , 7378 (1892-1963)
 ROBERT ALLERTON , 7379 (1893-)

(13) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1.1.1 HENRY Semple CUSHMAN 13896,13868,13904,13905, 7378
Birth6 Aug 1892, Bar Harbor, ME13868,13903
Death6 Jun 1963, Portsmouth, Rockingham Co. NH, age: 7013868
Birthca 1893, ME13905
FlagsNo Connect, of Meriman
Living in household of grandmother, L.V. S. Ames (Lucy Semple) in 191013906
Father b. Italy, Mother b. MO
SpouseMARY Andine UNKNOWN13868,13905 , 15012
Birth23 Feb 1895, Collinsville, Madison Co. IL13868
Death25 Oct 1991, Porstmouth, Rockingham Co. NH, age: 9613868
Birthca 1896, MO13905
Daughter of Joseph Dominic Lumaghi and Margaret Helen Blythe.13868
Father and mother both b. IL13905
Family ID5121
ChildrenKATHERINE “Kitty” Semple , 7380 (1919-2003)

(14) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1.1.1.1a KATHERINE “Kitty” Semple CUSHMAN* 13896,13868,13905, 7380
Birth24 Jul 1919, St. Louis, St. Louis Co. MO13868
Death12 Jul 2003, Leesburg, Loudoun Co. VA, age: 8313868
BurialUnion Cemetery, Leesburg, Loudoun Co. VA13907
Birthca 1920, MO13905
FlagsNo Connect, of Meriman
Lived in Leesburg 13896 Photo of stone at Find A Grave.13907
SpouseHANS EBERHARD “HANK” LOEFFLER13896,13868 , 7381
Birth8 Jan 1906, Witkowitz13868
Death17 Jul 1984, Zurich, Switzerland, age: 7813868
Family ID5123

Other spouses: ARCHIBALD MURPHEY AIKEN Jr

(14) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1.1.1.1b KATHERINE “Kitty” Semple CUSHMAN* (See above)
SpouseARCHIBALD MURPHEY AIKEN Jr13868 , 16572
Birth23 Jan 192413868,13907
Death3 Dec 2002, age: 7813907
BurialUnion Cemetery, Leesburg, Loudoun Co. VA13907
Son of Archibald Murphey Aiken and Corinne Conway Aiken. Photo of stone at Find A Grave.13907
Family ID11400

Other spouses: HANS EBERHARD “HANK” LOEFFLER

(13) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1.1.2 ROBERT ALLERTON CUSHMAN 13896,13908,13909, 7379
Birth19 Jul 1893, “Notchcliff”, IL13868
FlagsNo Connect, of Meriman
Apr 1910 Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, USA. Note: In household of L.V. S. Ames
Spouse(Living, Female)13868,13909 , 11271
Family ID5122
Children(Living, Male) , 16569
 (Living, Male) , 16570

(14) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1.1.2.1 (Living, Male) 13868,13909, 16569

(14) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1.1.2.2 (Living, Male) 13868,13909, 16570

(12) 1.1.4a.1.5b.1.2.1.1b.4a.1.2 ALLERTON SEWARD CUSHMAN 13887,13873, 7376
Birth2 Jun 1867, U.S. Consulate, Rome, Italy13887,13910
Birth Memoor Jun 9
Death1 May 1930, New York, NY, age: 6213887,13868
BurialEpiscopal Church Cemetery, Pomfret Center, Windham Co. CT88
Burial MemoNote his name is spelled “Alberton” at this site.
FlagsNo Connect, of Meriman
SpouseSARAH DUNN HOPPIN13887,13911,13912 , 7377
Birth2 Feb 1867, Providence, RI13887
Death8 Nov 1921, Washingtion, DC, age: 5413887
BurialEpiscopal Church Cemetery, Pomfret Center, Windham Co. CT88
Daughter of Dr. Courtland Hoppin, a physician, and Mary Frances (Clark) Hoppin, of Providence, RI13913 Photo of stone at Find A Grave. Inscription reads: “Ye will know by wise love taught that here is all and there is naught be ye stout of heart and come barvely onward to your home.”88 Daughter of Courtland Hoppin and Mary Frances Clark.13868

Mrs A Cushman dead. charitable and Religious Worker. Will Be Buried Tomorrow. Mrs. Albert Cushman, wife of Col. Allerton Cushman and fro many years active in charitable and religious work here, died yesterday at Sibley hospital following an operation. Pres. Cushman had lived here for 20 years, coming to Washington immediately after her marriage. Before her marriage she was Miss Sarah Hoppin. She is survived by her husband and one son, Charles Cushman, a student at harvard. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon from St. John’s church, with the Rev. R. C. Smith officiating. The pallbearers will be Dr. Ralph Jenkins, Clarence R. Wilson, Bond cochran, Joseph Bradley, Dr. Wayman Cushman and Victor Cushman. Interment will be in Comfort, Conn.13914
Family ID5120
Marriage20 Jun 1901, Pomfret Windham Co. CT13887,13910
Marr Memoor 6 Jun 1901
ChildrenCHARLES VAN BRUNT , 7383 (1902-1987)
 AGNES HOPPIN , 7387 (1905-1920)

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