(13) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.3 CRUGER HUDDART CUSHMAN 11085,11096, 6750
Birth4 Sep 1891, NJ11085,11125
Death9 Oct 1974, Charlotte, Mechlenburg, NC, age: 8311125,299,306
BurialConcord, NC299
FlagsGen#11
(William Cruger, John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Son of William Cruger Cushman and Margarett Coolidge Savage.
NEW YORK TIMES, 26 Aug 1916, p. 7
Cushman – Whitacre Wedding
Special to The New York Times
MONTCLAIR, N. J., Aug. 25.—Invitations have been issued for the marriage of
Miss Katherine Harlow Whitacre, daughter of Mrs. Charles Chase Whitacre of Montclair, whose Summer home is at West Brattleboro, Vt., and Cruger H. Cushman, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cruger Cushman of Edgecliff Road, Montclair, at Marlboro, Vt., on Saturday afternoon, Sept. 2. The Rev. Mr. Kellogg, rector of the Episcopal Church at Brattleboro, will perform the ceremony. The reception will be at Cold Spring Farm, the Whitacre Summer home.11125 retired Associate Deck & Co. Widowed at time of his death. Lived at 1418 Audubon Rd, Charlotte, Mecklenburg, NC299
SpouseKATHERINE WHITACRE11107 , 6756
Birth1895, IL11107,11125
Daughter of Charles Chase Whitacre and Georgia Clarissa Harlow.11125
Family ID4635
Marriage2 Sep 1916, Marlboro, VT11125
ChildrenCHARLES WHITACRE , 6757 (1917-1995)

(14) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.3.1 CHARLES WHITACRE CUSHMAN 11107, 6757
Birth1917, VT11107,11125
Death1995, age: 7811126,11127
FlagsGen#12
(Cruger H, William Cruger, John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Son of Cruger Huddart Cushman and Katherine (Whitacre) Cushman.

She met the love of her life, Charles Whitacre Cushman (Whit), while visiting family friends at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD. Although planning to marry in Jacksonville, Ensign Cushman was transferred from San Diego, CA to Pearl Harbor, HI. They were married in June 1941 in Honolulu, HI. On the morning of December 7, 1941, Beverly drove her husband and two other naval officers from Honolulu to Pearl Harbor during the second Japanese attack wave so they might join their ships. 11126

Published Thursday, December 7, 2000

Newlyweds hardly noticed attack impact

Navy wives, the unsung survivors, beginning to tell of infamous day


By Lindsay Tozer
Times-Union staff writer,

The crack of gunfire near their Waikiki apartment house didn't rouse suspicion, Beverly Cushman remembered, nor really did the plumes of black smoke she spied a ways away.
Such commotion could be expected near a military base.
Even on a Sunday.
Nor did the strained, urgent voice on the radio, ordering all men to their duty stations alarm her. Cushman and a Navy wife from across the hall simply slid into the back seat for the drive to the USS Detroit with their husbands.
"We wanted the car so we could go back later to have dinner on the ship and go see the movie," the 82-year-old Jacksonville Beach woman said. "We were so naive."
The first notion that the noise from the base was no exercise came when a police officer directing traffic stopped their car after spotting the wives.
Take them home, he told Ensign Charles "Whit" Cushman.
No women are allowed at Pearl Harbor right now.
Cushman is among those who bore indirect witness to the Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack on the Pacific Fleet : a Pearl Harbor wife, 59 years ago Thursday.
Although regarded as a Pearl Harbor survivor, and despite watching the global milestone unfold, she never considered her story significant.
"I suppose, as the greatest generation passes on. . .," she said, her voice trailing off. "My children keep urging me to write it down."
Whit Cushman, who survived the attack, died of natural causes in 1995.
With about 1,000 World War II veterans dying each day in America, and a woman's life expectancy historically longer than a man's, stories from such unsung Pearl Harbor survivors become more coveted each year.
Even so, in general, women of that era are reluctant to put their memories in the spotlight, said D'Ann Campbell, author of Women at War with America: Private Lives in a Patriotic Era.
"A lot of times women are very modest and it will be, 'I was just a housewife, I was just . . .' " she said, adding there has been no systematic effort to collect oral histories, even from women veterans of that era. "More and more, grandkids are actually interested and women are starting to tell their stories."
For a then-23-year-old Cushman, married only six months before, the initial bombing of Pearl Harbor would ripple on for three days.
Three days of collecting gas masks, lingering in line to cable simple messages to family and struggling to put blankets over windows for blackouts.
Although she'd found hints of encouragement -- the thunder of an American bomber flying overhead, the fleeting peace of a rainbow -- Cushman wanted news on her husband.
She'd find out later that the 24-year-old gunnery assistant spent those three anxious days on the Detroit hunting for Japanese ships.
'Not half as afraid'
In the days following the sneak attack, she and the other military brides could only wait out both the 6 p.m. curfew and the suffocating rumors that spread throughout the apartment building.
"We heard that the Japanese were on the beaches, or there was a great battle just outside the harbor," she said. "That the Japanese were landing just anytime, coming to get us."
The women whispered the horror stories they'd heard: a woman, just days from the delivery room, who crouched alone in a sugar cane field as bombs crashed around her; a sailor killed only weeks before his wedding.
"All the support we had, we had from each other," Cushman said of her fellow military brides.
When the noise died down and the chaos gave way to steely determination, about 2,403 Americans lay dead, another 1,178 wounded and a nation went to war.
Moored only yards away from two ships virtually destroyed in the attack, the Detroit became a virtual ghost vessel in the months following the bombing.
It would be in the South Pacific for up to six weeks at a stretch, often with only a few hours back at Pearl Harbor in between.
"They'd come home for a night and then be gone again," Cushman said with a soft smile. "Those were the nights we'd really live for."
Despite his frequent and lengthy absences, his wife said it was harder on those who were hearing second- and third-hand accounts back home.
"I think when you're at the place and know what is going on, you're not half as afraid as the families," she said.
While their lives eventually settled -- the couple had three children before Cushman retired as a Navy commander -- neither forgot that Sunday in 1941.
"It's always the day that lives in infamy," she said. "We talked about it all the time. You have to realize what a horrible tragedy it truly was.
"When I think of Pearl Harbor day, all I can think of is my gratitude that my husband was spared."11127


USS KIMBERLY DD-521 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The hazegray Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

CDR Harry Smith May 22 1943 - ?
CDR James Dickson Whitfield ? 1944
CDR Dale Calvin Reed Jan 1946 - May 1 1946
LCDR Thomas Hart Taylor May 1 1946 - Aug 1 1946
(Decommissioned Feb 5 1947 - Feb 8 1951)
CDR Oscar Blair Parker Feb 8 1951 - Dec 13 1953
LCDR Charles Whitacre Cushman Dec 13 1953 - Jan 16 195411128
SpouseBEVERLY DYER MULLIKIN11126 , 13378
Birth22 Apr 1918, Jacksonville, Duval Co. FL11126
Birth Memoat Riverside Hospital
Death3 Jan 2010, Jacksonville, Duval Co. FL, age: 9111126
Obituary: Beverly Cushman (widow of Cushman '39)

4Feb10 - Beverly Mullikin Cushman, 91, passed on in Jacksonville, FL on Sunday, January 3, 2010. She was born Beverly Dyer Mullikin on April 22, 1918 in Jacksonville at Riverside Hospital. Her parents were Fred L. and Helen Harvey Mullikin.
Beverly was raised in Jacksonville and Atlantic Beach. She was the oldest living graduate of Ortega Elementary School. She attended Robert E. Lee High School for one year and was a member of the IDS Sorority. She graduated from The Principia School in St. Louis, MO and attended Principia College. Beverly was a 1938 Jacksonville Debutante. She met the love of her life, Charles Whitacre Cushman (Whit), while visiting family friends at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD. Although planning to marry in Jacksonville, Ensign Cushman was transferred from San Diego, CA to Pearl Harbor, HI. They were married in June 1941 in Honolulu, HI. On the morning of December 7, 1941, Beverly drove her husband and two other naval officers from Honolulu to Pearl Harbor during the second Japanese attack wave so they might join their ships. She was evacuated from Hawaii in 1942 and spent the rest of the war in San Francisco, CA and Jacksonville where she served as an Airplane Spotter at Atlantic Beach. She was a mother and homemaker extraordinaire. She travelled throughout the United States and abroad during her husband's military and subsequent civilian careers and established full-time homes for her family 54 times. Upon Whit's retirement they returned to Jacksonville, dividing their time between their homes in South Jacksonville Beach and Highlands, NC for the next 25+ years.
Mrs. Cushman was predeceased by her parents, her husband, and her brother Fred L. Mullikin, Jr. She is survived by her three children - Charles W. Cushman, Jr. (Chrissy Dittmar), Amanda Cushman Knobel (Stuart) and Kenneth King Cushman. She was a proud grandmother of Brooks Knobel (Stephanie), Carter Knobel (Mary Beth), Alex Cushman Ota (Bowen), Charles W. Cushman, III and Andrew D. Cushman. She was also a Great-Grandmother to Grant Knobel, Anna Dyer Knobel, Crawford Knobel, Burns Knobel, Kieran Ota, Hall Knobel and Emily Ota. Beverly Cushman was a lifelong member of the Christian Science Church, a member of the Junior League, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Jacksonville Garden Club (Beaches), Jacksonville Historical Society and the Republican Party. She was a past member of the Norfolk Yacht Club and Philadelphia Country Club. Beverly Cushman loved her church, friends, travel, the beach and sea, books, Big Band music, dancing, clouds and Southern food. Most of all she loved her family and her husband Whit. She was never known to have said a mean thing about anyone. She was a "Steel Magnolia" and a sweet lady of a bygone era.
A Memorial Service will be held at The Casa Marina Hotel, 691 First St. North, Jacksonville Beach, FL at 11:00 AM Friday, January 15, 2010. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to the Christian Science Church of Jacksonville Beach, 2nd Church of Christian Science Avondale or the Jacksonville Historical Society. Please Sign the Guestbook @ Jacksonville.com
Published in Florida Times-Union on January 14, 201011126
Family ID4641
MarriageJun 1941, Honolulu, Hawaii11126
ChildrenCHARLES Whitacare 3rd , 13379
 AMANDA , 13381
 KENNETH KING , 13383

(15) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.3.1.1 CHARLES Whitacare CUSHMAN 3rd 11126, 13379
FlagsGen#13
(Charles W., Cruger H, William Cruger, John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Son of Charles Whitacre Cushman and Beverely Dyer (Mullikin) Cushman.
(Charels W.,Charles W., Cruger H, William Cruger, John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Son of Charles Whitacre Cushman and Chrissy (Dittmar) Cushman
SpouseCHRISSY DITTMAR11126 , 13380
Family ID9221

(15) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.3.1.2 AMANDA CUSHMAN 11126, 13381
FlagsGen#13
(Charles W., Cruger H, William Cruger, John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of Charles Whitacre Cushman and Beverely Dyer (Mullikin) Cushman.
SpouseSTUART KNOBEL11126 , 13382
Family ID9222

(15) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.3.1.3 KENNETH KING CUSHMAN 11126, 13383
FlagsGen#13
(Charles W., Cruger H, William Cruger, John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Son of Charles Whitacre Cushman and Beverely Dyer (Mullikin) Cushman.

(14) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.3.2 (Living, Female) 11107, 6758

(14) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.3.3 (Living, Female) 11107, 6759

(13) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.4 CONSTANCE HUNTER CUSHMAN 11085, 6751
Birth10 Apr 1892, Montclari, Essex, NJ11085,11129,774,774
Birth MemoSu, Union, NJ
FlagsGen#11
(William Cruger,John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of William Cruger Cushman and Margrette Collidge (Savage) Cushman. Children listed in Cushman Chronicles.11130 She is listed as “Constance Savage Cushman” by Susan Rockwood Bradley11129
SpouseRICHARD EDWIN BRADLEY11130,11129 , 6760
Birth5 Oct 1889, New Haven, New Haven, CT11130
Family ID4636
Marriage2 Feb 191811129

(13) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.5 Margaret Louise CUSHMAN 11085,11097,11098, 6752
Birth10 Jul 1894, Union, NJ11085,774
Birthca 1895, NJ11098
FlagsGen#11
(William Cruger,John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of William Cruger Cushman and Margrette Collidge (Savage) Cushman.

(13) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.6 Douglas Hobart CUSHMAN 11085,11097,11098, 6753
Birth19 Jan 189611085,306
DeathMar 1981, age: 8511131,306
Death Memo091-03-4888 issued NY
BurialSaint Stephens Episcopal Cemetery, Millburn, Essex Co. NY11131
Birthca 1897, NJ11098
FlagsGen#11
(William Cruger,John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Son of William Cruger Cushman and Margrette Collidge (Savage) Cushman. Navy Seal in WWI. Photo of stone at Find A Grave.11131

The following from an e-bay auction of a group of letters belonging to two sisters, Geraldine and Dorothy Moore of Havre de Grace Maryland:

This group of letters belonged to two sisters; Geraldine and Dorothy Moore of Havre de Grace Maryland. There are about 100 pieces in this lot and about 60 of them are handwritten letters. Then there are some empty addressed envelopes and other cards. The most interesting thing about this group was that when I first starting reading them I thought for sure the two sisters would be married because most of the letters are love letters to one or the other. However, there are several different men represented but the census records show that they are still single in 1940. They must have been quite the catch too because all of the men who wrote sure thought a lot of these girls.
     Their father was Lester and their mother Isabelle. Dorothy was the oldest daughter born in 1894 and then Geraldine was born in 1900. At one point the family lived in New Jersey but after their father died (and I believe he died before 1910 as he is not on the census records), mom and the two girls moved to Havre de Grace Maryland in the “Burns Apartments.” I found a fabulous vintage photo of these historical apartments and scanned it here. Later on in the 1930’s some of the letters were addressed to South River New Jersey.
     The earliest letter is from 1908 and the last letter dates from 1937 with most of the letters being from the 1920’s. As I said above, most of these letters are love letters or letters from their boyfriends. In fact I was rather shocked too because there are several letters from Douglas Hobart Cushman who lived in Farmingdale New Jersey to Dorothy. His letters talk about engagement rings, buying a house, marriage plans and everything but then nothing. In fact Dorothy gets letters from other men after this. Douglas does say that until he gets the right job he can’t marry her. I believe they are engaged for a few years too. In the 1930 census it shows Douglas as still living at home and not married. Then in the 1940 census I found him and this time married to a woman by the name of Mildred. Wouldn’t I have loved to have known what happened to this couple. And as far as Douglas is concerned, he was in WWI and also in WWII and during the First World War he was a Navy Seal!!!!
     Then there’s Geraldine’s letters. One of them is so steamy I was shocked that it came from the 1920’s. Its 12 pages long!!! and written by a man by the name of Ted who’s at West Point Academy. Oh my goodness, what a letter this one is. I’ve quoted some of this letter below and scanned a few of the pages. And again, more letters later on to Dorothy from other men. So how come these girls never married??? Or maybe they did in their later years. There are also letters from their mother, some from friends and other members of the family.
     I pulled out a few letters to share some example quotes. The first one I’m using was written by the girl’s mother. She writes her letter on “U. S. Forces Somewhere in America” letterhead. Have no idea why. She’s in the Atlantic Highlands in New Jersey at the time the letter was written….
“February 10th, 1918
My Darling, I was so glad to hear last night you go your check. It bothered me quite a little being so far from home and not having any money…..Honey, I hope you keep to your word and don’t go on that auto ride. I want you to have all the fun you can but believe me there is other ways of having fun besides going autoing with fellows you don’t know. If Cussie and Lisette want to go let them, also Mildred, but from what I have seen of her I don’t believe she will go. Dear even if Mr. Codwell and Mr. Warren ask you to go motoring, please don’t go but from what you have told me about those two I believe they are too gentlemanly to ask it. I thought I would only caution you for fear they do otherwise. Going to the dances and to church and asking them in afterwards you have my full approval because I know you know the right thing to do…..With lots of love and kisses to my dear baby, Mother.”
“177 Third Ave. Long Branch, N. J. Oct. 29th, 1918
Dear Geraldine, I presume you have returned to Havre de Grace by this time and as long as I have a few spare moments decided to answer your letter. So you were glad to get back to the Jersey shores. Thought you might call on me while so near but no doubt your time was all taken up in the Highlands (beg your pardon) Atlantic Highlands. I remember how disgusted you were when we forgot Atlantic. Long Branch is still in quarantine and I guess they will never lift the ban. Suppose somebody is making a little extra money. We had a lovely ride to Freehold the other day. I had never been thru the jail and as we know the people who live there we had no trouble in going through. Suppose Havre de Grace is the same as ever. Ruby has also moved and is living much nearer town. Met Florence Clark the other day. It was the first time I have seen her in about four months. Lisette will never over exert herself in writing. It certainly is warm here today. The weather is very changeable. One day it is very cold the next day like summer. No wonder there are so many people sick. Remember me to all and hoping to hear from you soon, I am your friend, Mildred Clark.”
“Cu-Beu Farm Farmingdale, N. J. Jan. 5th, 1921
Dearest Dorothy,…..Have been looking over two catalogues of houses tonight. Hodgson and Sears and Roebuck houses. Hodgeson houses are portable and Sears and Roebuck are cut to fit. I like the looks of the cut to fit houses better. Can get a cut to fit house for $1,357.00 with as much as 5 years to pay it in. My partner sent for a catalogue of cut to fit houses with drawing of the interior of the houses. Will send you a catalogue of some when I get it…..Much love from your devoted Douglas.”
“Cu-Beu Farm Farmingdale, N. J. Jan. 7th, 1921
Dearest Dot,….In regards to the veterinary course, I would not be the only veterinary doctor around here as there is a well known veterinary in Freehold and perhaps others too but Dr. Runyon in Freehold is the only one I’ve ever heard of. Whether I take the course or not the ring and photo will come first. I went to Freehold this morning in the car when my partner took his father to the station there. The car had to be fixed and we stayed around Freehold about an hour waiting. We went into the best jewelry store in town and (there are only 2 jewelry stores in Freehold). I picked out the engagement ring. It is a solitaire diamond with a Tiffany stetting. 14 Karat gold. The diamond is ¼ carets. Don’t know whether it is just your size but if you will send me your ring size for that finger I will see that it is made the right size and send same to you some day next week……With much love Douglas.”
“39 N. Fullerton Ave. Mountclair, N. J. May 25th, 1921
My Dear Dorothy, Your intended visit to your Uncle in East Orange has been a settled fact for so long that it never occurred to me till this moment that I had not yet written to ask you to come here for dinner with us next Sunday. Douglas’s letters have been so full of the plans for this visit that I am only sorry we cannot at this time extend more of an invitation to you. It was hoped at one time that we might be able to move into the Whitacre Cottage by that date but it could not be managed. So I have written to Douglas that we want him to bring you over here Sunday forenoon and in the afternoon we can all go up together to the hill as Mrs. Whitacre has kindly asked us to go to her house for supper. I am only sorry that Mr. Cushman will not be here with us to meet his new daughter-to-be but he goes every year at this time for a golf trip. However he hopes to see you the next time you come…….Believe me yours very sincerely, Marguerite S. Cushman.”
“U. S. S. Eagle #15 c/o Portmaster, New York, N.Y. Sept., 12, 1921
Dearest Dot, Haven’t written you a letter for several days as I’ve been so busy. I went to the Third Naval Dist. Headquarters on Friday to be examined and they said I could be examined the following morning (Sat.) on board. So I waited. Went to a vaudeville show in N. Y. on Friday afternoon and went to Upper Montclair for over night and reported aboard next morning. Sat afternoon we left 157th St. New York and went to Sandy Hook. Stayed there over Sunday. Had liberty last night and took a shipmate ashore with me whose home is in New Haven Ct. Some of his actions during the evening made me sorry I had taken him with me, as I went to see the Leonard’s…..We are in the Brooklyn Navy Yard tonight but I have the 12-2 A.M. watch on the bridge tonight so I couldn’t go ashore. We expect to be in New Haven. Don’t know how far North we will go before the two weeks cruise is over….Much love from Douglas. (xxxx)”
“378 Park St. Upper Montclair N. J. Oct., 10, 1923
Dearest Dot, Please forgive me for not writing sooner. Meant to, but didn’t write. I arrived home Sat. evening about 9 P.M. and as I entered the house I heard my mother telephoning and my father was groaning with pain. I rushed up stairs and found my mother trying to get a doctor which she finally managed to do and he came right over. My father had been offered a drink of something at the County Club along with some other men by some friend or acquaintance. When he got home he felt ill and sat on the porch then feeling worse he went upstairs to lay down and a paralyzed feeling started to come in his legs so he go up and kept moving on one leg and then the other. The doctor fixed him up ok and his is now as lively as ever…..I either have a position on Ward Line steamer (S. S. Mexico) on Tuesday, or start in Wed. with typewriter co. in Newark on a drawing acct…..Much love from Douglas (xxxx).”
United States Military Academy West Point, New York (Letterhead)
“Thursday Feb. 28th, 1924
Dearest, (I believe this one is to Geraldine but I can’t quite make out the initial on the front of the envelope. However he uses a nickname, calling her “Gerry”). I found the example you’ve set in lessening the number of your letters easy to follow……My letters I think will be written in a less passionate tone from now on Dearest. Having two roommates one has little time for loneliness and desires. One is so seldom alone. I shall try to resume my old style dearest of just sweetheart’s letters. Twill not find that I am growing cold. The desires will still exist my darling but twill mean that they are sleeping, saving and storing their immensity until thus sweetheart….But surely dearest mine you cannot have wondered whether I would have displayed as insatiable a curiosity for knowledge of such intimacies as your under things and the like had I been with you. And still if you have wondered it has not been without cause. I have been so frank, so confiding. I have not hesitated to tell you anything. You would under those circumstances have been justified in wondering. I can only assure you again Gerry Dearest, that I would never have thought of such things. My desires had I been with you would have been for your voice, your words of love, your eyes, occasionally your sweet moist lips and a close hug, and embrace dearest. Those wonders would have delighted me and those only I would have asked for nothing more…..I think that now I can safely promise not to cause you blushes by any further “declarations of desire” Dearest. I shall save all such until then. I can quite understand your being unable to comprehend my wanting you as I did Dearest. How could you Darling, you a virgin fair and pure. Twould not be seemly did you comprehend before our marriage the meaning of my desires. Then you will learn and I sure beloved you will find delight as well as I in learning. Doubt is unworthy in both of us Dearest, let us forget the possibility of loosing each other. Let us be assured of each others love. Let us forget all but our promises so often given to have forever and a day; our promises of marriage of happiness of understand…..Our correspondence of the last month or two, my correspondence at any rate, has been of a frivolous nature seeking delight in sensual thrills. Let each of us try hence forth to express the fullness of his love seeking ever to impress upon the other the exalted spirit which stirs within his breast…..I love you, your happy Ted.” (Believe me there is much more to this letter that’s worth reading)
“January 13th, 1932
Dear Geraldine, It seems ages since I have written to you. I really do not know where to start. Did you have a nice x-mas? The first thing I must tell you is your old boy friend Ted is stationed here. He has been here since last Oct. and I only found it out yesterday that it was your old friend Lt. Williams. Mabel Harrington told Mrs. Gilbert it was he. He wears glasses now as I remember him when you introduced him to me, he does not look much like he did then. He is here with the Acd. School I think. I told you about it being here so you see you should be working here now Oh what a good time you could be having…….Is there anything you would want me to tell Ted? Writes soon, As ever Evelyn.”
     There is so much more to these letters than what I’ve quoted here. I would love to know more about these two sisters. Did they ever marry? Why with all the talk of buying a house, a ring and meeting his parents, why did Dot never marry Douglas? So interesting.
11132

(13) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.7 MARY ALLERTON CUSHMAN 11085, 6754
Birth7 Aug 1898, Su, Union, NJ11052,774
FlagsGen#11
(William Cruger,John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of William Cruger Cushman and Margrette Collidge (Savage) Cushman. Was divorced from Thomas Cooper.11130
SpouseTHOMAS COOPER11130 , 6761
Family ID4639
Children(Living, Female) , 6762

(14) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.8.7.1 (Living, Female) 11130,11097, 6762
SpouseZACK DOWLING11130 , 6763
Second marriage.11130
Family ID4644

(12) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.5.9 CONSTANCE CUSHMAN 11048, 6339
BirthJul 186711048
Death10 Nov 1868, age: 111048
FlagsGen#10
(John Henry Hobart, Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of John Henry Hobart Cushman and Mary (Huddart) Cushman

(11) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.6 ANGELICA BARRACLOUGH CUSHMAN 2,11059, 5144
Birth4 Mar 1826, NYC2,11048
Death15 Sep 1898, New York, NY, age: 7211060,11048,11133,264,11134
Death MemooJeff dehart says 6 Sep 1908, Orange, Essex Co., NJ
FlagsGen #9
(Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of Don Alonzo Cushman and Mathilda Charity Smith (Ritter) Cushman. She is referred to as Angelica Faber in a NY Times article and is reported living at 430 West 20th Street, NYC, NY11135 Children and descendants listed in Cushman Chronicles. 11133
SpouseGUSTAVUS WILLAM FABER2 , 5145
Birth2 Sep 1823, Hamburg, Germany2
Death9 Mar 1895, Ny, NY, age: 7111048,264,11136
Family ID3529
Marriage15 Sep 185311133,11059

(11) 1.1.4a.1.5a.1a.2a.4.1a.5.7 EMILE ARNAULT CUSHMAN 2,11059, 5146
Birth7 Sep 1828, New York City, New York2,11060
Death26 Oct 1897, Paris France, age: 6911060,11048,11137,11138,11139
Death Memoor, New York, New York; or 1896
BurialOak Hill Cemetery, Rockland Co., NY11140
FlagsGen #9
Don Alonzo, Minerva, Allerton, Allerton, Allerton, Elkanah, Thomas, Robert). Daughter of Don Alonzo Cushman and Mathilda Charity Smith (Ritter) Cushman. Had five children. 2 Had six children, all listed in Cushman Chronicles.11137
SpouseGEORGE WILCOXON2,11048 , 5147
Name could have been spelled Wilcoxson11048
Family ID3530

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